Fire Cider

My first memory of trying fire cider is some eleven years ago, when I was coming down with something and my neighbor handed me a small jar, telling me it would kick it in the butt. I took a sip and felt that jolt of firepower from the strong stuff. It cleared out the yucks quick and clean as wildfire, no doubt! Today I share with you the way I make this wonderful concoction, in hopes that it will inspire you to try your own creation of this time-honored brew.

I’ll just be honest here, I don’t measure. It’s always an intuitive, enjoyable process for me and measuring just takes the fun out of it. You can find plenty of other recipes for fire cider in books, videos, classes, and online where they give precise measurements if you are one of those “must measure!” types. Every recipe you’ll find varies a little, and every time I make my own it varies a little. Which, in my opinion, is wonderful.

Ingredients (all organic, local if possible, from the garden even better!):

Honey-infused fresh turmeric
Honey-infused fresh ginger
Honey-infused hibiscus
Fresh horseradish
Cayenne peppers (fresh or dry)
Fresh garlic
Apple cider vinegar

I LOVE infused honeys. I am a total infused honey addict. If you’d rather just add the macerated herbs and honey separately, that’s fine- but I’ll briefly explain how to make an infused honey, should you desire to become an addict to deliciousness, like myself. If you want to skip this messy, amazing, tasty step, go right ahead.

To make infused honeys:

Macerate your fresh roots in a food processor (or chop finely). If you are using dry herb, such as lavender or hibiscus, this is unnecessary. Scoop herb into a crockpot, cover with honey (blending it in), and leave on “warm” for a few hours, stirring occasionally. While it’s still warm, pour it through a mesh strainer. In the container below you will have your infused honey, in the strainer above you will have your honey-infused herb. An alternative way people make infused honeys, is to simply put the herbs and honey together in a jar and let sit for a number of weeks. However, I personally find the warming method more effective. Plus when you are done scraping out the crockpot, you can pour in a hot cup of tea, melt the remaining honey into it, and have a yummy sweet cup of tea and waste minimal honey at the same time. 🙂 Granted it’s still a messy process. But life is messy.

So, for this recipe, I use the honey-drenched herb left over from making my infused honeys. For a quart jar, I use about three large spoonfuls each of turmeric, ginger, and hibiscus. I must give credit for the awesome addition of hibiscus to one of my fabulous herbal teachers Juliet Blankespoor, who shares her delightful fire cider recipe here (complete with measurements)!

In a Quart Jar:

Three large spoonfuls each of the honey-infused turmeric, ginger, and hibiscus
2-5 (depending on your fire level) large cayenne peppers, crumbled
1 small chopped fresh horseradish root
3-8 cloves of chopped fresh garlic
Apple cider vinegar to cover

Put ’em all together, shake ’em up, and let sit for 2-6 weeks. Strain out the material and you got it! Fire cider! It should be okay on the shelf for a long time, but to be safe I refrigerate mine after straining, and use within a few months. Take a few sips anytime you are feeling under the weather or need a power boost. Many folks who tend to run cold or have poor circulation take it daily as a tonic. I probably don’t need to say it, but this stuff is SPICY! Use caution. It can be blended with a little juice to make it more tasty if desired. I take a sip of my Fire Cider and a tablespoon of my Stay Well Juice (elderberry syrup) anytime I have been exposed to illness, cold, or stress, as a preventative to keep me healthy.

Yeah, making infused honey is messy. And YUMMY!

Yeah, making infused honey is messy. And YUMMY!

Honey-infused turmeric, ginger, and hibiscus, in jars to use in making ciders, teas, or elixirs.

Honey-infused turmeric, ginger, and hibiscus, in jars to use in making ciders, teas, or elixirs.

Or you can use straight herb and just add plain honey to the jar, if you wish. Hibiscus.

Or you can use straight herb and just add plain honey to the jar, if you wish. Hibiscus.

Garlic and ginger

Garlic and ginger

Turmeric

Turmeric

Dried cayenne peppers, from my summer garden.

Dried cayenne peppers, from my summer garden.

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